Trailer of the Week!

This weeks trailer of the week is a low key one, but it goes to:

Goodbye Christopher Robin (Trailer #2)

Domhnall Gleeson and Margot Robbie head up a movie here that might be bit on the low key side, but its certainly not lacking in acting talent. It following the life and story behind A.A. Milne’s world famous Winnie the Pooh series of books inspired by his son Christopher Robin. The story itself looks to tell both a larger and smaller story here however, as we see clips in the trailer showing both his struggles with PTSD, as well as letting his son influence his work in a direction he probably never expected.

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The movie seems to be much more of a character study on the lives of these characters, than the characters of Pooh and the like, where we get a real in-depth look at how these kinds of culturally changing events occur. I’m not sure just how large a role Robbie will have as she doesn’t have much time in the trailer, but with her capability as an actor, I have no doubt that she will be smash any level of a role she’s given.

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What do you think about this Goodbye Christopher Robin trailer, is it too low key of a movie for you, or are you a fan of the more dramatic stuff? Either way comment and let me know what you think about it, and if you plan on seeing this movie.

Review : The Cutlass

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“Inspired by true events, THE CUTLASS is a dramatic thriller set in the tropical wilderness of Trinidad and tells the story of a young woman who falls into the grasp of a dangerous sociopath. She finds herself isolated and musters the courage to emotionally battle the unsettled mind of her abductor.”

As the summary implies, this movie both takes place and was made by and in Trinidad and Tobago (so if you’re not from or in the Caribbean you might not be able to see this one). Its written by Teneille Newallo, and directed by Darisha Beresford, and it boasts a genuinely diverse cast across all levels. The movie itself is definitely more good than bad, but first, the good. Arnold Goindhan who plays the antagonist here, has the meatiest role, and the most heavy lifting, acting wise to do here, and he does a pretty good job. He does come across as sincere in his more vulnerable moments, and when he keeps his portrayal subtle, he really shines. He does this across from Lisa-Bel Hirschmann, who definitely keeps her acting as subtle as possible, but for the most part doesn’t have as much to play against. Her most emotional scene however, is done really well, and she does tug on the heart strings with her performance there. I do think some of the cinematography does lack a bit of imagination, as I think it would have allowed for some more powerful scenes with some better framing. I also did have some problems with the sound, not in that it was bad, or not done properly, there just were a few times when I felt in either the ADR, or straight audio mixing of the audio, that some dialogue didn’t feel like it was happening in the situation, but sounded more like a voice over. The score I also wasn’t too impressed with, for the most part it was very subdued and subtle, and thats fine, but I felt like when it really needed to swell and help impart some emotion or suspense, it came off a bit lack luster. And lack luster is how I would define the ending of this movie, for most of it, everything in the movie is building towards to a head, towards some kind of resolution, and you just never get it. There is an ending here, and there are definite resolutions in the script, but things don’t feel resolved, they feel like what we invested in before, was fully paid off. I know I probably sound like I really don’t like this film, but I did like it, the things that it did well, it genuinely did. There are some problems here yes, like any movie really, but this movie definitely shows the raising levels of Caribbean film making. Production wise this is one of the best local (local meaning Trinidadian) films I’ve seen. All in all, I do encourage anyone who has the opportunity to check this movie out to do so, supporting local industries is important for growth, and there is definitely enjoyment to be had in this movie.

Review Score : 7 out of 10

Review : Dunkirk

“Dunkirk (2017) Robert Paege Allied soldiers from Belgium, the British Empire and France are surrounded by the German army and evacuated during a fierce battle in World War II.”

Firstly, it must be said, the British navy had the sweetest coats ever, so stylish and I’m sure some warm, unto the movie now. In some ways Dunkirk is unlike any other Chris Nolan movie, and in some ways it’s like the best of his movies. This movie is first and foremost an education in film making. This movie is absolutely gorgeous, and uses some of Nolan’s most effective and trademark camera techniques (like when he locks a camera down to something then let’s that thing role or spin), and here those methods work really well to build tension and a real awareness of tight spaces. This movie is also anchored by an amazing score from Hans Zimmer, which is in itself anchored by a ticking clock that goes through the entire movie save the last 3 or so minutes. Together the cinematography and score, when added to Nolan’s directing, make for a movie that people will probably use to teach these things years from now. This movie isn’t perfect however, and the one real flaw it has, is a bit of a gaping hole. There are a good few characters for us to follow here, set on three different time lines, but we get about zero character development for any of them, which makes feeling for them in situations of danger difficult. Don’t get me wrong, you feel the danger, but the characters in danger could be anyone really and it wouldn’t even matter that it’s Harry Styles or not. The real question here is does this lack of the movie’s soul hurt it, and how much does it? Well it does, and it does hurt. We see some of these characters no some horrible things, and they’re either never redeemed, or given sufficient background to give those actions meaning. All in all, Dunkirk is a triumph of film making, but it can’t transcend to being a triumph of film.

Review Score : 7.5 out of 10

Trailer of the Week!

This weeks trailer of the week goes to:

Detroit (trailer #2)

You might have thought our trailer of the week this week might have been another black centric movie, but as much as I love the Black Panther trailer, I think this Detroit trailer is really something special. Detroit is the next film from acclaimed director Kathryn Bigelow of Point Break (not that new one), The Hurt Locker, and Zero Dark Thirty fame. Set to star a stellar, all be it young cast with the likes of John Boyega, Will Poulter, Jacob Latimore, Hannah Murray, and even the likes of Anthony Mackie, plus so many more, this movie looks to deliver some great performances.

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The story is of course based on true events, with a script penned by Mark Boal who has worked with Bigelow before on The Hurt Locker and Zero Dark. It centers around a police raid that occurred in 1967 which then lead to some of the worst riots in American history, seeing even the National Guard being mobilized. I think this is going to be a really visceral and intense movie, made all the more difficult to watch knowing of how much truth lies behind its narrative. What do you think about the trailer? Does this movies look like something you’re going to want to see, or do you think it will be too much for you?