Review : Dunkirk

“Dunkirk (2017) Robert Paege Allied soldiers from Belgium, the British Empire and France are surrounded by the German army and evacuated during a fierce battle in World War II.”

Firstly, it must be said, the British navy had the sweetest coats ever, so stylish and I’m sure some warm, unto the movie now. In some ways Dunkirk is unlike any other Chris Nolan movie, and in some ways it’s like the best of his movies. This movie is first and foremost an education in film making. This movie is absolutely gorgeous, and uses some of Nolan’s most effective and trademark camera techniques (like when he locks a camera down to something then let’s that thing role or spin), and here those methods work really well to build tension and a real awareness of tight spaces. This movie is also anchored by an amazing score from Hans Zimmer, which is in itself anchored by a ticking clock that goes through the entire movie save the last 3 or so minutes. Together the cinematography and score, when added to Nolan’s directing, make for a movie that people will probably use to teach these things years from now. This movie isn’t perfect however, and the one real flaw it has, is a bit of a gaping hole. There are a good few characters for us to follow here, set on three different time lines, but we get about zero character development for any of them, which makes feeling for them in situations of danger difficult. Don’t get me wrong, you feel the danger, but the characters in danger could be anyone really and it wouldn’t even matter that it’s Harry Styles or not. The real question here is does this lack of the movie’s soul hurt it, and how much does it? Well it does, and it does hurt. We see some of these characters no some horrible things, and they’re either never redeemed, or given sufficient background to give those actions meaning. All in all, Dunkirk is a triumph of film making, but it can’t transcend to being a triumph of film.

Review Score : 7.5 out of 10

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Review : The BeguiledĀ 

“The unexpected arrival of a wounded Union soldier at a girls’ school in Virginia during the American Civil War leads to jealousy and betrayal.”

The Beguiled 2017, not the be confused with the 1971 movie of the same name, is the latest from Sofia Coppola. The movie even won nabbed her the coveted best director award at the Cannes Film Festival. And honestly, that shows because this movie is really a directors showcase. That’s not to say that there isn’t great acting on display here, there certainly is, but this movie is all about directing and directorial choices. The first two acts of this movie as completely soundless, in terms of musical score or the like, all we get is either dialogue or something like birds chirping. When we get to the third act however, the reason for that decision becomes clear as when the first horn blast hits us, it really rocks us, in a way it wouldn’t have if we had it all movie. And that really is the corner stone of this movie in its strong, purposeful, and definite directing choices. It’s also a really hard movie to review in terms of trying to rate it. It deliberately paced, but it’s also only about 90 minutes. It has distinct directing, but great subtle acting (most of the time). This is a movie I think that’s really made for certain people. Some people will see this movie as boring and a bit silly, others will see it as tense, suspenseful and unnerving, and in there somewhere is this movie. All in all, The Beguiled is a real showcase of directing, with enough great acting on there too for good measure, and a story that’s definitely something else.

Review Score : 8 out of 10